Real Answers from Real Pilots

February ’21 Schedule

76.84 Credits. FINALLY caved and purchased a LogTen Pro subscription. I regret not buying it sooner.

We are back to 100% capacity. This month in particular we actually serviced a handful of completely full flights. I know on our aircraft that’s not much to begin with, but it’s been over a year since my last full flight so it definitely feels good to see things beginning to move in the right direction.

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Tory,

Great to hear you are back at full capacity, I just spoke the other day at my FBO with a Piedmont Captain flying the E-175 and said they’re full capacity as well. Maybe things are picking up afterall!

I’ll need to hear about the LogTen Pro subscription, I remember Hannah was recommending an app she used and some others chimed in, curious to know what your thoughts are.

Brady

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Tory,

I also am curious about your thoughts on LogTen Pro. Wondering if that subscription would be beneficial going into applying for an airline. Right now I just have my physical logbook and ForeFlight logbook.

That’s super encouraging to hear about full flights! I’ve actually seen that myself as I’ve flown to Seattle from Spokane a couple times in the last couple months (Q400 and 737) and the flights have been pretty full.

Myself and a couple fellow instructors here at my school are hoping to get the chance to submit applications to Horizon this summer!

Kyle

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Brady and Kyle,

I should preface that this is the only electronic logbook I’ve used so I don’t have anything to compare it to. A while ago I tried to go the cheap route with MCC Pilot Log and I was unsuccessful. So, this time I surveyed at least two dozen pilots. The majority of them use LogTen Pro.

The biggest deterrent initially was the $80/yr subscription (for the iOS only version). But when I learned that it was easily the logbook of choice of most of my peers it was becoming harder to refuse. Plus, I always assumed that the subscription was over $100/yr. Being that it isn’t it made the decision much easier.

As far as the functionality, it’s very user friendly. The more I use it, the more tail numbers and airports are saved on app, and the quicker it is becoming to log a flight. I have also had discussions with other pilots about importing my schedule to the app. I know that there is a way to do it. I just haven’t taken the time yet. But that would make things even easier. Right now I just have it set up to autofill my flight times after I’ve entered the OUT OFF ON and IN times. Then I have to manually enter each airport identifier, aircraft, tail, and crew. But once I figure out how to import, most of that will be autofilled too.

I just love being able to log every flight before the next as with before I put it off for 6+ months. Now, a few seconds after every flight and it’s done. And way less math errors to worry about.

Tory

That would be AWESOME! As soon as they announce the next open window I will update everyone.

Tory

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Tory,

New pilot here win around 60 hours still working on my ratings, on instrument training now. I always wanted to start backing up or using an electronic version in case I somehow lose or damage/destroy my paper logbook. A few questions regarding your electronic logbook. First is how did you input the hundreds or thousands of lines and hours from previous flights in your paper logbook to the electronic logbook? Secondly, do you still write everything down in a good old fashioned paper logbook as a backup to the electronic logbook? Finally do you suggest the electronic logbook for students or CFIs?

Thanks,
Sam

Sam,

I haven’t imported any of my previous flight time from my paper logbook. Not sure I ever will. And no I don’t log my time in paper anymore. This is the primary reason for purchasing the e-logbook. My electronic logbook is backed up to the cloud. All of my time at Horizon is also tracked internally. If I need a backup to my backup I have options.

@bleutigre Yes I do recommend electronic for students. The sooner the better. The longer you wait the longer it will take to transfer everything over.

Tory

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Sam,

Sooner is always better. You’re going to want to have all your info in one place. More important when you go for that interview at a Major airline you’ll look a lot more pro with everything in one nicely bound book.

Adam

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Tory,

Is there any sort of drastic difference in what a typical schedule looks like for a Q400 pilot versus a 175 pilot at Horizon? I know the Q’s don’t go as far and so most of their destinations are in WA and OR whereas it looks like you get more of the chance to go to SoCal or even the midwest from time to time. But I was curious if pilots of the other airframe fly more or less legs in a day or if there’s anything else drastically different in the day-to-day operations of one airframe than the other besides the aircraft itself and the destinations they travel to.

Kyle

Kyle, does this help?

Here’s a better one.

Awesome! Thanks! The first one actually makes more sense to me. Looks like a Q400 pilot is going to spend most of their day flying from base to base and then likely end their day at one of their central WA or OR destinations. The second one is a bit confusing, but maybe I just don’t understand what I’m looking at. I’m not understanding the trips from PDX to SLC and PHX mixed in there.

Did you not think that the Q had the range? Maybe the daylight savings is throwing you? The Q can get from PDX-SLC in under 2hr, and PDX-PHX in 2.5. I know it’s weird to see a Q on what you’d assume would be a 175 route and vice versa. Truth is it doesn’t make much sense to me either :joy: We all assumed that the 175 was going to be on the primarily longer routes, but that has turned out to not be the case. Sure the 175 is used on the routes that the Q can’t reach, but as you can see the company uses both aircraft interchangeably. With the 175 now equipped with Cat III Autoland and RNP 0.1 it is essentially just as capable as the Q in regards to approach capabilities and it also offers a better service for the passengers.

Tory

I am with Kyle on this, I am surprised that Alaska is scheduling the Q-400 on such long flights. Two and a half hours from PDX-PHX on a propeller driven aircraft sounds interminable to me. I would disagree with it offering a better service to the passengers, it is loud, it vibrates, and is much slower than any jet out there. I was so happy when United removed them from the express fleet.

Airlines sometimes do some wacky things due to finance making the decision vs people who actually have frontline experience. I remember when Continental put Republic CRJs on ExpressJet ERJ routes because they were cheaper. Problem was the CRJs didn’t have the capacity and the range so the planes would have to go half empty. We were all scratching our heads but it was above our pay scale.

Adam

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Chris,

I agree. I wasn’t referring to the Q.

Tory

Out of curiosity, I looked up the flight numbers for those trips from PDX to SLC and PHX on FlightAware and it seems to indicate that those were E175 flights. I’m curious why a pilot would have trips on both airframes indicated on their schedule. :thinking:

My bad!!! That’s a Flight Attendant’s trip! :man_facepalming:t2: Standby

Thanks for the tip Tory and Adam. I was just looking at the LogTen Pro website and it’s apparently free for student pilots (up to 250 hours total time) so it’s a great way to start the conversion while also saving money until I can actually make money instructing when I’ll have to actually pay for the subscription.

Sam

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