February-March ’22 Alaska New Hire Schedule


Happy to announce that I am officially typed!

Training was both challenging and fun, but mostly fun, of course. I am excited to fly the real thing. That said, I am expecting at least a month long delay before IOE.

February:
1.
2.
3. FTD PT 5 (Fixed Training Device Procedures Training)
4. FTD PT 6
5. FTD PV (Procedures Validation)
6.
7.
8.
9.
10. FFS MT 1 (Full-Motion Flight Sim Maneuvers Training)
11. FFS MT 2
12. FFS MT 3
13. FFS MT 4
14.
15.
16.
17.
18. FFS MT 5
19. FFS MT 6
20. FFS MT 7
21. FFS MV (Maneuvers Validation)
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27. FSS LOFT 1 (Line-Oriented Flight Training)
28. FSS LOFT 2

March:

  1. FSS LOE (Line-Oriented Evaluation/Type Ride)
  2. OE Ground
  3. OE Ground
  4. OE Ground
  5. Max Familiarization FFS
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Congrats Tory! Btw, how different is this than flying the ERJ?

Thank you, Ravi,

I would say the biggest difference is how the pilot manipulates and monitors the aircraft systems.

The ERJ was designed using a 12 o’clock, dark, and auto flight deck concept. Meaning, most of the switches and pushbuttons in the flight deck are left in the 12 o’clock position, dark (not illuminated), and in the auto position.

A simple example is the anti-ice system. Basically, if the ice detectors on the ERJ sense ice accumulation, the anti-ice system will automatically turn on wing and engine anti-ice for as long as the ice detectors sense ice accumulation plus an additional 2 minutes after exiting icing conditions. While this is a very basic example, imagine this same concept applied to just about every other system on the airplane.

On the 737, for the most part, the pilots take a more active roll when it comes to configuring the aircraft’s systems for each phase of flight. It is much more of a pilot-centric airplane which makes it truly fun to fly.

Tory

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