Real Answers from Real Pilots

July 2017 Schedule

In July I had fourteen days off and 91 hours of pay.

  1. GRR-ORD, ORD-EWR
  2. EWR-AUS, AUS-IAD, IAD-EWR
  3. Off
  4. Off
  5. Off
  6. EWR-DCA, DCA-IAH, IAH-OMA
  7. OMA-DEN, DEN-EWR
  8. Off
  9. Off
  10. Off
  11. Off
  12. EWR-LAS
  13. LAS-IAD, IAD-ORF
  14. ORF-ORD, ORD-DFW
  15. DFW-EWR
  16. Off
  17. Off
  18. Off
  19. Off
  20. Off
  21. EWR-ORD
  22. ORD-EWR, EWR-TPA
  23. TPA-IAH, IAH-LAS
  24. LAS-EWR
  25. EWR-CLT
  26. CLT-EWR
  27. Off
  28. EWR-MIA
  29. MIA-ORD, ORD-AUS
  30. AUS-EWR
  31. OFF
2 Likes

Hi Chris,

Thank you for posting your schedule! I have a couple questions regarding it however. Do you fly the same type of plane for the entire month? Or do you bid for different types of planes? How exactly do you bid for the type of plane? Can you change the type of plane you fly in the month or do you have to wait for the next month?
Thank you for the time to answer my questions!

Jesse

Jesse,

We fly the same type of airplane from month to month. For example, I fly the 737, have for the last two years and will likely continue to do so for the foreseeable future.

We have large, system wide bids every few months where pilots can bid to change aircraft types. Generally speaking, one can only change airplane types every two years.

Keep in mind that these airplanes are highly complex and the various types can be very different from each other. It generally takes about six weeks of training to transition from one type to the next.

Chris

Thanks Chris! I noticed in a couple other threads where you mentioned you like to switch up going international and domestic. Would going international always require a bigger aircraft? And if so you have had training on a 767 but want to go back to the 737 would you have to go through all the training again for the 737?

Jesse,

Flying “international” usually means flying a larger airplane as the 737s do not have the fuel endurance to be able to fly across the ocean, whereas the larger airplanes do.

Now, the 737 does fly to Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and much of Central America, but when pilots say “international” they usually mean “overseas”.

Going back to an airplane that you have previously flown does involve an extensive amount of training. The time required varies based on how long you have been off the airplane. Anything over two years usually requires a full training course again.

Chris

Thanks Chris!

Anytime :slight_smile:

Chris,

I noticed you stated you had “91 hours of pay”. Is that typical, and what is the industry average for something like that? I have noticed that on numerous “projected pay scales” it shows commercial pilots in the 100k range within 5-7 years, and upward of 200 after 10 - 12. Is that an accurate assessment or mainly top earners posted as a way to generate interest?

Josh,

Ninety one hours is pretty typical for me, most pilots average between 80 and 90 hours per month. Check out his article that I wrote for an introduction to pilot pay scales:

https://airlinepilot.life/t/what-do-pilots-really-earn/?source_topic_id=6128

Chris

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Chris,

That was a helpful article. I want to make sure I understand correctly, that if you are fortunate enough to upgrade to Captain after 2 years at a Regional, you would then be paid for a 3rd year Captain? So it goes off of time at the company, not time in the position?

Jason,

Yes, that is correct. You would be on third year pay.

Chris

1 Like