Jumpseat Etiquette

Since we often get questions about jumpseating (and more particularly because my FO just said “I wasn’t sure if he was going to cry or wet himself” after I “educated” a new young pilot on proper JS etiquette after he demonstrated a clear lack of knowledge) I offer the following. While it may be a little soon for most of you it’s never too early to learn. Enjoy.

Adam

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Definitely way too far ahead, but was a great video to know and understand the procedure! Thanks Adam!

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This is a nice video! I watched it myself just to refresh a bit!

Hi Adam, thanks for sharing. I believe you sport a beard at HA…has that made for any challenges when jumpseating at other airlines as rules can vary?

Ravi,

It actually does. Both American and Delta are very strict with the policy. Knowing that I usually stick with United when JSing as they’re far more lenient.

Funny story (kinda). During the peak if COVID I needed to get to NY and there were very few flights other than AA. Knowing their policy, I was begrudgingly prepared to shave when I told a friend of my dilemma. He said “silly man, it’s COVID and you have to wear a mask. They’ll never know”. In truth if I had to actually had to sit up front in the cockpit I wouldn’t have done it, but since I knew I’d have a seat in the back…

Adam

Adam,

Why is it enforced if you’re sitting in the back? I assume it’s to maintain a professional look, but do the passengers really know you’re a commuting pilot?

Ben

Ben,

For some carriers it’s about looks, for others there’s still concern about beards and O2 mask usage. Regardless as a JSer you are an “additional crewmember” and are therefore required to adhere to whatever the airlines grooming policy is.

Adam

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Ben,

You don’t ever know for sure that you will get a seat in the back until you actually board. It could be a completely full flight and your boarding pass could show that you are assigned to the jump seat. Thus, you would introduce yourself and provide your credentials to the captain. However, there is still a small chance that you could be assigned a seat in the back if someone doesn’t show for the flight.

The idea is to be prepared for the chance that you do actually have to sit in the jump seat. In that case, it’s better to not take any chances.

Tory

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Tory I’m going to call you out on this. Even if the flight is wide open and the agent give you a seat in the back, you still should check in with the Capt.

Adam

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Thanks. It does sound like that’s what I was insinuating. I was trying to give an example of how late of a notice you could receive about an available cabin seat, but I agree. The flight load doesn’t make a difference in terms of jumpseat etiquette.

Thanks for clarifying.

Tory

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