Real Answers from Real Pilots

Where?!

I just arrived in the USA on April 2017. I completed my high school in Nigeria around July 2014. I don’t know how to go about my pilot program. I have applied to various universities with my converted transcript which indicated a GPA of 2.8.
I took my SAT in 2015 and my total score was a little over 1600 out of 2400.
I am currently considering starting with ATP but I was told that I have to acquire a certain amount of college credits. Or get a PPL.
At this juncture, I feel like I’m really confused and I don’t know where to start from or what to do. (Reason being that I’m also considering my financial boundaries in terms of student aids and/or loans).
Please I need someone who can provide me with the guidance and counselling in correspondence with my current situation.

Michael,

You are correct, you cannot train with ATP unless you have your PPL, a 2yr degree or equivalent work experience. Also keep in mind you need to pass a very thorough background check before you can do any flight training in the US. Your best bet may be to complete your university education first and get that out of the way. That would give you some time to get the check completed and investigate your flight training options. You should also know that to work as a pilot in the US you must be a citizen or have permanent resident status.

Adam

Thank you Adam.
Did you mean I can take the BSc degree course in any university that offers
a degree in Professional Pilot/ Aviation and then opt in to ATP for the
practical aspect?

Also, is it advisable to take the course online because I still want to
continue with my current Job

Michael,

ATP (and the airlines for that matter) simply want a degree, the field of study is completely up to you. Online is fine as well.

Adam

That sounds like a relief.
But to be sure I got you right, do you mean I can study any course even if
it doesn’t relate to aviation?

Michael,

That is as long as you want to be a pilot in the US. I cannot state with any certainty the requirements elsewhere in the world but here that is a fact. Accounting, medicine, music, history, whatever you like. It’s also a good idea to have something to fall back on in case aviation doesn’t work out.

Adam

Michael,

I always like to point out that I once had a boss who’s degree was in piano composition. In the US at least, the field of study really does not matter.

Chris