Zero to 1500 with ATP - My Experience

Hey Everyone!

It’s been a long time since I posted about my experience on here, so I thought I would provide an update on my time with ATP. Thursday, 11/17/22, was my last day as an instructor with ATP. I started and finished out my instructing time at ATP’s location at Cincinnati-Lunken Airport, working as the lead instructor for a majority of my time and, beyond early summer 2022, I also served as our locations multiengine instructor. I initially had no intention of finishing all of my flight time at the Cincinnati location, but I really enjoyed the students, my fellow instructors, the airspace, tower controllers, FBO and ramp staff, and more. In the end, I felt that this location was a great (safe) training environment and an excellent location to build hours and teach people to fly!

Flight Time Summary

Here is a brief summary of my flight time as an instructor with ATP (for those who are curious!):

Overall, as an instructor I averaged around 70 hours a month. During the winter the hours dropped, but you can see by the end of this summer I was averaging around 100+ hours per month (August being an outlier because I took two weeks off to visit family abroad). These numbers also reflect the increase in training and program enrollment post-COVID for ATP. When I started in Cincinnati, there were only 2 instructors and around 6 students, but by the end of my time here, we were averaging enrollment of around 20-30 students, with the need for 8-10 instructors. So the location grew significantly during my time!

I feel as though my experience could potentially differ from others in their journey to 1500 hours. With the exception of around 10-15 hours from personal rentals, the entirety of my 1500 was earned through my time as a student and as an instructor with ATP. I started the 9 month program back in mid-June 2020 at the Charlotte (JQF) location and finished in late February 2021. I began instructing with ATP later that year in mid-July 2021 (Delay because of COVID backlog) and finished this month, November 2022. From start to finish, it was around 29 months from zero flight experience to 1500 hours (approx. 25 months if you remove the COVID gap).

My Experience

I feel as though my experience as a student differed greatly from my experience as an instructor. As a student, I only had the ability to reflect on my personal experience through the program (because of COVID, there wasn’t as much student-student interaction). I luckily suffered no major training delays and ATP delivered exactly what they advertised. I finished on schedule and on budget, and I worked with a great group of instructors who knew how to train to a high level. My time as an instructor really made me appreciate how fortunate I was as a student.

As an instructor, I was able to see the complexity and challenges that ATP faces to have 1000+ students nationwide in the same program attempting to meet a tightly structured timeline. Working as an instructor, especially with ATP, requires far more than showing up to the training center to complete a training event. I found that I spent 10x more effort working as an instructor (in terms of time spent each week and stress!) than I did as a student. I was also able to see the challenges that can be faced on a day to day basis. Things like plane availability, weather, maintenance and checkride delays become more apparent as an instructor.

Overall, my 2.5 years with ATP was a great experience. They delivered on their promise to me as a student, and as an instructor I felt I was given the resources and the opportunities to be grow whilst having the pleasure of training future pilots. The experience of working as an instructor has only matured me as a pilot and as a leader, and I could not think of a better way to earn my 1500 hours. Undoubtedly ATP’s greatest asset is their team of dedicated instructors who are working tirelessly to ensure that the next generation of pilots is successful. I am very thankful that I had the opportunity to work with some of the best instructors in the country!

What’s Next?

My goal was and has always been to be given the opportunity to work for an airline as a pilot. Through ATP’s airline partnerships I was able to apply and interview at several regional airlines earlier this year. In the end, I was very pleased with the prospect of working for Envoy and I felt that they were the regional that best fit my aspirations. I’m very excited for the next steps toward my future career and the journey over these past 2+ years has only given me more motivation to work as hard as possible to make it a reality! Here is a picture I took of an Envoy E175 at Dayton International last month:

Thank you to all of the students, instructors, mentors, and admin staff that I have worked alongside here at ATP, it would not have been possible without your help!

Roscoe

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Great post Roscoe!

I remember when you first joined the forum asking questions (not sure if I yelled at you or not?) but it’s fantastic to see you’ve “made it”.

I’m sure many will appreciate the details and timeline of your experience with ATP. I’m sure it’ll help inspire others to follow your path.

Now comes the REALLY fun part!

Congrats!

Adam

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Roscoe,

Congratulations on becoming an airline pilot! It is amazing to see people like you who came on here as potential students come back and tell us that they made it all the way. I am so thrilled for your success.

Please continue to update us as your progress through your career. Your experiences will be very valuable to those who come behind you.

Congratulations again!

Chris

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Roscoe,

I think Tempus Fugit fits this thread well.

What a way to finish out your career at ATP, congratulations on all your success and hard work. It’s been a pleasure to see your journey and catch you on a few meetings back in the spring. I am excited to see your career as an airline pilot, please keep us posted.

Enjoy flying the Embraer 175 for Envoy! I hope to catch you around the American hubs one day.

Brady

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Roscoe,

This is a super cool post to come across for me today. I remember doing your First day welcome orientation at the KJQF location back in summer 2020 as well as your subsequent Solo Eval and other evals to follow.

Now I get to read your farewell post, reaching 1500 hours and starting your next journey as an airline pilot.

Thank you for taking the time to share your insights on both sides of the coin (student and instructor/lead). We wish you nothing but the best throughout training and your journey ahead. Feel free to stop by from time to time and let us know how things are going at Envoy.

Hannah

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Roscoe,

Congrats! I really appreciate your write up. I like how you detailed out your path to 1500 hours.

I am starting in less than 1 week and it seems like such a long journey. While my path might differ from yours it is great reading about how you went from 0 to working at an airline and makes it seem much more manageable when just starting out. I look forward to the day when I get to share my own experience. Until then, I will just continue to celebrate everyone else’s success.

Stevan

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Thanks Roscoe for this synopsis of your time as a student and instructor for ATP! It is very encouraging!! I’m planning to start ATP next spring in Minnesota, so it’s really great to hear about your experience in both roles. Hoping I can work as an instructor for ATP as well; and currently studying q’s to take the exams before starting.

I’m so excited for you on your new position with Envoy, and your career progression ahead! What a fun journey!!! :smile::airplane:

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Adam,

Thank you! Having now gone through the program and then instructing for the past year and a half, I have a better understanding for the reasoning behind the tips/helpful advice you give on here. I think at times I was a little naïve, and coming on here and reading mentors posts gave me a better insight into the industry and what it really takes. I hope my experience can help someone along their path too.

I haven’t “made it” yet, but I know that this was a massive hurdle and I’m ready for the next one! Excited for what comes next!

Thanks,

Roscoe

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Chris,

Thank you! I will be sure to come back on here and update my progress throughout training once I get started.

Roscoe

Brady,

Thank you for the kind words! I hope your training with Piedmont has been going well! I’m sure you have missed our weekly Thursday lead meetings since you finished with ATP. I have enjoyed following along with your journey too. And, as you mentioned, I hope we have the opportunity to cross paths again in the near future!

Roscoe

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Hannah,

Thank you! I hope you are doing well! It has been a long journey since we worked together in 2020. I’m very appreciative for everything you and the team of instructors at Charlotte were able to do for me. It really set a solid foundation to build upon. I will be sure to keep you all updated on my training with Envoy.

Roscoe

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Congrats and nice write up!

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Hey everyone!

I’m very appreciative of everyone’s feedback on my previous post, I just wanted to post a quick update. This past week I had the pleasure of visiting Dallas for my ATP-CTP course with ATP Jets. It was definitely interesting to see another side of ATP flight school and to see their facilities and operations outside of the career pilot program. I was pretty excited to be a student again and learn completely new material, which will hopefully help aid in the transition from general aviation to high-altitude jet operations. The instructors, both ground and sim, were excellent, and the personal experiences they shared, as either current or former airline captains, was extremely valuable. Taking the course material and extending it to real world applications was something, as an instructor myself, that I very much appreciated. The highlight of the week was the time we got to spend in an A320 full motion level D flight simulator. Interesting to see what concepts translate well from smaller aircraft and what completely new considerations need to be made. Here is a picture of my sim partner and I after our short field landing in Reykjavik (Luckily I didn’t run off of the end of the runway!).

During my week in Dallas, I was also fortunate to be given an orientation date for Envoy of December 29th. So I’ll be back in Dallas for orientation at the end of the month. Luckily I was able to share a CTP class with a few other ATP graduates who also have the same orientation date with Envoy, so we are all looking forward to that! The hope is for a January class date to begin training.

Thanks,

Roscoe

5 Likes

Congratulations! I can only imagine how exciting this is after the years of work. I’m starting at ATP in February and couldn’t be more thrilled. Will I need to pay for the ATP-CTP course out of pocket, or is this something that a prospective airline will cover?

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Daniel,

The Regional that hires you will either provide the ATP-CTP or pay for your training.

Adam

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Thank you, Adam.

Roscoe,

What did you think of the side stick as compared to a yoke?

Chris

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Roscoe,

Really ecstatic to hear more of your experiences at Envoy. Thanks for sharing the photo in the Airbus FSS. Enjoy your holiday break and time with family and friends, Roscoe. :snowman_with_snow:

Brady

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Roscoe,

Glad to hear you enjoyed ATP/CTP. It really is a cool experience. After a long road of time building, it’s the kind of experience that reminds you why you started this career in the first place: the love of flying! Now you’re shifting back to a student role and growing as a pilot once more.

Congrats on the upcoming orientation and class date! Enjoy the holidays and best of luck in the new year! Of course, do keep us updated when you can!

Hannah

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Chris,

The side stick was definitely a little weird at first, but after a period of hand flying, I could see how you could really get used to it quick. Not needing to trim to relieve control pressure is unique. Just set the position and let go and it holds it for you! Very cool. I think I would still prefer a traditional yoke, but if you gave me more time with the side stick, my opinion would probably change! What really confused me for a little (which I’m told is not just an airbus thing), was that the roll pointer with the slip/skid indication doesn’t move on the attitude representation when you bank, only the head or top arrow moves. With all of my experience in a G500 aircraft, having the ‘triangle to triangle’ wings level representation react backwards was hard to get comfortable with, but it makes sense why it’s like that when you practice the upset recoveries.

Roscoe